rohingya

Hydrocarbon?

The Rohingya conflict in Myanmar, which had caught its second wind in August 2017, appears to be a multidimensional crisis with major geopolitical players involved, experts say, referring to both internal and external reasons behind the recent upsurge in violence in the country.

According to Mosyakov, the century-long conflict is used by external players to undermine Southeast Asian stability, especially given the fact that what is at stake are vast reserves of hydrocarbons located offshore of the Rakhine state.

“There’s a huge gas field named Than Shwe after the general who had long ruled Burma,” Mosyakov said. “Additionally, the coastal zone of Arakan [Rakhine] almost certainly contains oil hydrocarbons.”

After the massive Rakhine energy reserves were discovered in 2004 they attracted China’s attention. By 2013 China completed oil and natural gas pipelines, which connect Myanmar’s port of Kyaukphyu with the Chinese city of Kunming in Yunnan province.

The oil pipeline allows Beijing to deliver Middle Eastern and African crude bypassing the Malacca Straits, while the gas pipeline is transporting hydrocarbons from Myanmar’s offshore fields to China.

Myanmar’s destabilization may affect China’s energy projects and create a pocket of instability at Beijing’s doorstep. Given the ongoing crisis between the US and North Korea, another Chinese neighbor, Beijing may soon find itself caught in the crossfires.

Soros?

Meanwhile, the Burma Task Force, which comprises a number of organizations funded by George Soros, has been actively operating in Myanmar since 2013 calling upon the international community to stop what they call “the genocide of the Rohingya Muslim minority group.” However, Soros’s interference in Myanmar’s domestic affairs goes deeper into the country’s history.

The Council of Foreign Relation’s (CFR) 2003 document entitled “Burma: Time For Change,” which announced the establishment of the group insisted that “democracy… cannot survive in Burma without the help of the United States and the international community.”

“When George Soros comes to this or that country… he looks for religious, ethnic or social contradictions, chooses the model of action for one of these options or their combination and tries to ‘warm they up,'” Egorchenkov explained, speaking with RT.

On the other hand, according to Mosyakov, it appears that some established global economies are seeking to contain the rapid economic development of ASEA nations, by instigating inner strife within the bloc.

The academic opined that the globalist management policy envisages sowing discord in stable regional formations. By fuelling regional conflicts external players jump at the opportunity to gain control over sovereign states and exert considerable pressure on them.

Source: SPUTNIK https://sputniknews.com/analysis/201709051057098493-myanmar-rohingya-energy-china-soros/

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