THE OPPOSITION finally gets bigger with the much publicised Parti Pribumi Bersatu Malaysia (PPBM) being green-lighted by the Registrar of Societies (ROS), albeit without their acronym of choice.

Surely, most of them would have thought this would be the beginning of the end for the UMNO-led Barisan Nasional coalition.

Do you think so too? Think again.

oppositionWith the inclusion of PPBM, the Opposition now has 3 (if we exclude PKR) Malay-majority parties.

Oh wait, I have forgotten about Ikatan but I doubt they have much of an impact in the country’s political arena.

Moving on, if we compare on the ruling coalition, only UMNO is the Malay-majority party.

In other words while UMNO will contest in every Malay-majority seat in the next elections, the Opposition would have to split the same amount between Amanah, Pas, PPBM, Ikatan as well as PKR.

If DAP wants to throw in a Malay candidate, it will add more headache for the coalition.

Which party will contest which seat?

All these arrangements, if not handled well will result in a messy situation which in turn will give the advantage to BN.

Judging by the Opposition’s showing this past 8 months, clearly they are not in unison over many things.

Shouting that they want an end to BN’s reign without seriously working towards that proves the depth of their cooperation.

images-1It is only a matter of time before the wheels come off and they will be at each other’s throat.

When that happens, the people will realise that the better coalition would have to be Barisan Nasional.

It requires great leadership and foresight to steer the country in the current economic situation.

If the Opposition can’t even agree on seats, do you expect them to administer the country.

Surely, there would be squabbles over who will take which portfolio.

This, if happen will be detrimental to the progres of our country.

That is why, BN might even call for an early elections.

They may have enough in the tank to wipe out these unprincipled power addicts of the Malaysian political arena.

Khairul Amir is an independent political and economic analyst and Malaysian Access reader. Article written is strictly his personal view. Malaysian Access does not necessarily endorse the opinions given by any third party content provider.